Knee Pain

Knee Pain

Knee Pain

Knee is the largest joint in your body. It is a complex joint made of bone, cartilage and ligaments. The cartilage in the knee acts as a cushion and gliding surface. When healthy, the cartilage keeps the bones in the joint from rubbing together. However, when the joint is affected by arthritis, the bones make contact and cause pain. Injuries, aging and degenerative conditions such as arthritis can cause the cartilage to break down

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a chronic condition that causes joint inflammation. Symptoms include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness and pain.

Up to 40 percent of the population may have knee osteoarthritis, or wear and tear arthritis. This is the gradual breakdown of the cartilage in the knee. Also called degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis usually develops over years and often is found in patients who have had a knee infection or injury and those who are overweight/

As cartilage wears away, the bones around it can grow thicker and develop bony spurs. This can lead to increased friction between the bones and disrupted movement in your knee. This also can lead toproblems with the synovium, a membrane in your knee that produces a liquid to keep your cartilage slippery. This membrane can become inflamed and make too much fluid. This results in swelling, or water on the knee. In the most severe cases, the knee can become deformed as the continued friction wears away the bone. Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, tenderness, a limited range of motion and a grating sensation when you bend your knee. The pain is usually worse after activity.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect joints on both sides of the body (both knees, both hands and/or both wrists). In rheumatoid arthritis, your body’s cells attack your own tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis affects three to five times more women than men and often presents between the ages of 20 and 50.

Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause cartilage to wear away, swelling in the synovium, and excess fluid in the knee. In later stages, bones can rub against each other.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of any of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) protecting the body’s joints. This is usually caused by repetitive motions or by a stress such as kneeling. Sometimes, a sudden injury can cause bursitis.

Tendonitis

The tendons rope-like tissues connecting muscles to bone at the knee and other joints can become painfully inflamed by repetitive and strenuous movement. Tendonitis is a common sports injury, caused by overuse of the same parts of the body. Patellar tendinitis, or jumpers knee, is an inflammation or irritation of the tendon between the knee cap and the shin bone.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)

Knee pain or discomfort while walking up and down stairs, jumping or squatting may be symptoms of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This common knee problem is felt toward the front of the knee. It can cause a grinding sensation when bending or straightening your leg, and can cause the knee to occasionally buckle. Sometimes called runners knee, patellofemoral pain syndrome may be caused by a kneecap that is not aligned properly, overuse, injury, excess weight or when the cartilage in the knee cap is worn significantly.

Injuries

Knee injuries can be the result of sports, falls or trauma. They typically involve the ligaments that hold two of the bones of the knee the femur and tibia together eg-ACL, MCL, & Meniscal injuries

A careful medical history which includes

  • A description of knee pain (aching, tenderness, burning or swelling)

  • Where the pain is located and when it occurs?

  • When did the pain start (and if it is the result of an injury or accident)?

  • Anything that makes the pain worse or better

 This condition can be rectified with a variety of Homeopathic remedies

Other diseases treated

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